Appreciating a Child, and her Eye

A simple thing is often missed.

Look at this photo for a little while…

This is our unspectacular, slightly wonky, 33 year old chandelier, an upgrade done by the previous owners of our place. They bought the house, new in 1984, and sold to us in 1985 for a handsome profit. We chose this place because it backs onto a narrow, forested park through which a gentle stream flows and warblers, hummingbirds and Monarch (what’s left of them) butterflies migrate every spring and fall. The central staircase made us go oohh, ahhh when our agent and friend took us through. Sold!

Anyway, this is about stuff we 70 somethings learn to take for granted until a grandchild shows us how she observes her much newer world.

This past Christmas our M, just turned 4, a frequent visitor all the way from Ann Arbor, Michigan said:

Papa, one of the lights in your chandelier is not on. 

Did you notice it? It’s obvious now, isn’t it?

She and her mom stayed from December 23rd until January 7th. They love to visit. We love to have them.

It is now March whatever and Papa has still not replaced the bulb. There is no excuse for this neglect. I have spares in the unfinished section of the basement, hanging in a plastic shopping bag on a simple nail beside my wooden, homemade workbench.

Think I’ll go and change it now… before their next visit…

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“Be”

image

My post of October 25, 2014 has been revised by adding the poem, Be, to the photo. The haiku was started on a return flight from Trinidad and finished a week later, when it was originally posted. My thoughts at the time were added to the post.

La Mouvement Décroissance

Unsustainable is a word that must explode, not creep, into our everyday vocabulary. Our economies, as they currently are measured, cannot continue to grow.

I chose décroissance over degrowth for the title because the French word hints at the verb décroireto disbelieve. This is important because, for the concept, it is necessary for one to disbelieve in the current capitalist model that demands growth as its life blood. On both sides of the Atlantic, those who pretend to lead in the great drama of politics extol economic growth as the basis of national success and happiness. Growth is measured by an outdated parameter called Gross Domestic Product, a measure that does not care how the jobs and productivity are created. The classic example of its failure is that, from the aspect of GDP, the Exxon-Valdez oil spill off the Alaska coast in 1989 was a “success.”

David Suzuki, who, based on a 2004 CBC poll, is considered the 5th greatest Canadian ever and, by a process of biotic elimination, the greatest living Canadian, has, since the 1980’s, been a high-profile advocate for reducing our impact on the environment. Thanks to Suzuki and other caring thinkers, many now kind of “get” the fact that we in “The West” pamper ourselves by using up precious resources in obscene amounts to provide very special goods and services. We consume too much of everything (energy, minerals, meat, fish, forests, chemicals, drugs and yes, even health care) and have grown to believe that these relative luxuries are things to which we in the West are entitled.This “entitled” feeling battles with the growing guilt and, if we are honest about it, usually wins.

From David Suzuki's hand to mine...
From David Suzuki’s hand to mine…

Continue reading “La Mouvement Décroissance”