Fidel Castro

Rebelde Fidel
El Morro – Santiago da Cuba (photo from 2010 Cuba Trip)

I have long admired Fidel Castro, who did much to bring world-class literacy and health care to all Cubans and to countries in need. Fidel, who died on November 25, was no saint, but I believe a pure idealist would never have had the strength to withstand the pressures, the attempts on his life and the crippling, decades-long embargo applied by the USA.

I have been to Cuba twice. The second time, in 2010, my wife and I traveled widely on the island by public bus and stayed with local people in their homes.

I have posted on Cuba and on Fidel Castro previously here:

Cuba – A Reflection in 2010 (Re-posted in 2012 from a blog since closed)

On Fidel Castro

We Need to Nurture Hope

The Golden Age of Arab Spain:

I love reading the opinions of others. It is through this that I get motivated to think and write about ideas that are new to me.

I read a piece recently claiming that Spain’s Catholics somehow lied about, or wildly exaggerated, the “Moslem Invasion” of 711. The author called it a “myth.” The purpose of the myth, according to the writer, was for the Church to blame an embarrassingly dark period in its history on something foreign that “She” could not have stopped. An interesting point of view that I cannot, at this point, share.

In my opinion there is overwhelming evidence (linguistic, artistic and architectural) that much of Spain south of Toledo and possibly north as far as Zaragoza was occupied by a liberal Arabic dynasty centred in Cordoba for close to three centuries.

Yes, Liberal Arabs:

I used the adjective, liberal, because openness to new ideas and tolerance of Christians and Jews was emblematic of the threatened  Umayyad dynasty that entered Spain in 711 after fleeing Damascus, the Umayyad capital based in Syria. Umayyads had put together the fifth largest empire in history. Continue reading “We Need to Nurture Hope”

Buddhism and Political Action

 

Why has every man a conscience then? I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward. It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right. The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right.

Henry Thoreau

Perhaps some Buddhists who read this can help me by critiquing my concern that I personally need to continue to act to improve the world, despite Daoism’s prescription that we should not, and cannot, act to change our world for the better. Comments are welcome.

Continue reading “Buddhism and Political Action”