Ducks On Our Front Lawn??

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A pair of Mallards in our front garden near our Magnolia check me out.

At the beginning of an ice storm, as the trees start to collect ice on their branches, my spotter noticed these two on the lawn. The female’s beak gives her away and this is only a crop of a low resolution photo taken by my old iPad Air.

Made me think how important the male colouring is to attract a female but, once the important job is done, her camouflage becomes vital and his perhaps less so. A new insight for me perhaps…

But the appearance of these two on our front lawn is something we don’t remember ever seeing. A few in the creek behind our house are common, and the two small subdivision “lakes” have plenty because folks, yep…, feed both them and the plentiful geese that like to be fed the easy way.

Anyway, it’s worth noting.

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Birding Season Soon!

Though they stay through the winter we don’t regularly see this bird at our feeder, but he was there today. I spooked him when approaching the patio door to the back yard. He returned later to our maple tree, where he was when I took these through our dining room bay window “hiding” behind our 46-year-old, oft-pruned lemon “tree,” grown from seed in 1972 as a fun thing to show our first two children.

The above were taken with my Sony A-6000 and its (55-210 mm) lens fully zoomed using medium speed continuous shooting at 1/1250 s and f/13. Never could have done that in the really old days with Kodachrome-25 film!!

A great way to get motivated to look for the first kinglets and warblers – later this month…

Autumn in “Our Woods”

 

 

 

It has taken a while, but it’s unanimous now: Fall has fallen. My favourite Canadian season. We only have three here: Summer, Fall and, of course, winter. Spring is usually crushed by Summer before the poets can get more than a few lines scribbled down.

Fall has deliciously dawdled this year.

Waiting For Winter? Not!

Sumac Confusion

Above is evidence of a serious debate between branches of Sumac near here as to whether fall has fallen. The majority Green Party seems to think not.

Sweet Peas
Sweet Peas still here October 8

Thought I’d reaped the last of the sweet peas on Sept 28 for a tiny bouquet to greet Anita when she came back from a family funeral in Trinidad, but there were more. The garden has never stayed so beautiful for so long.

I thought that overseeding parts of the lawns on September 19 was tempting fate, but there’s been no frost and above seasonal temperatures and the seedlings have done well.

My enthusiasm shown in this post is, in view of the extreme, human-caused suffering experienced by so many in the Caribbean, North America, and by all forms of life worldwide that depend on our Planet’s finely-tuned biosphere, a “tad” selfish. It’s just that, from time to time, we all need to focus on happy things like this and show appreciation for the love and hard work that people close to us have put into making things so much more beautiful.

The only winter I have really come to fear is a nuclear winter.

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That said, here are the photos taken on October 8 that made the cut:

 

 

 

 

Ruby-Throat Enticement

Hummingbird at feeder
Proof from a few years ago… See my Birds ‘n Stuff page

Update July 27: We saw a hummingbird at the decorated feeder before leaving for Iceland on July 15, so I refilled it with fresh sugar water on the 15. Saw a hummingbird visit it on our return July 25!